Plotting a series


I confess: I’m writing a series.

If I get the opportunity to finish it, it will be three books long.

I’ve read that it’s important to ensure the first book stands on its own – in case I don’t get the go-ahead on the rest. Check. I’ve also read that when writing queries, it’s important to suggest the series in an ambivalent fashion, that the book “could” evolve into a series – to give the publisher the utmost in flexibility. (Thank you Nathan Bransford!) I can do that.

But here’s where I run into trouble. How much plotting of books two and three is appropriate? Should I be ready to provide prospective agents with a complete synopsis of the full trilogy, or should I wait until (IF!) book one sells? 

I’m finding it’s actually somewhere in between. In order to properly set up book two in the first book, I need to know basically what happens. As a result, as I move through draft four of my WIP, I’m keeping a point-form list of broad-strokes plot points for the second and, to a lesser extent, for the third book. I love plotting, so I have to admit, it’s tough not to forge ahead with it!

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Plotting a series

  1. But here’s where I run into trouble. How much plotting of books two and three is appropriate? Should I be ready to provide prospective agents with a complete synopsis of the full trilogy, or should I wait until (IF!) book one sells?

    I’ve been pondering the same questions. I’ve just begun querying book one (which stands alone) but I’d like to take the characters through a full trilogy. Other than vague plot points swirling through my head, I’ve not done any concrete outlining for books two and three.

    • Hey there! I’ve always hoped that if an agent was interested, they would give me time to fully flesh out the plot for the other two books – so they’d have all the material they would need to sell it either as a stand alone, or as a series. At least that’s what I would do if I was in their shoes.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s